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One of Wisconsin’s first two COVID-19 Deaths confirmed in Ozaukee County

Together with state health officials at the Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS), Governor Tony Evers confirmed two deaths in Wisconsin due to COVID-19 on March 19.

The first death was a male in his 50s from Fond Du Lac County. The second death was a male in his 90s from Ozaukee County.

“Our hearts go out to all the loved ones affected by these deaths, and to all those suffering from this virus,” said Governor Evers. “We are committed to fighting the spread of COVID-19 in Wisconsin and I want to recognize the hard work and bravery of our nurses, doctors, state health officials, and all those on the front lines in the effort to save lives. Together we will get through this historic health challenge.”

Working with the Centers for Disease Control and Wisconsin public health officials, Governor Evers declared a state of emergency on March 12. The action allowed DHS to use all available resources to respond to and contain the outbreak.

“We are very saddened by the death of these individuals and my heart goes out to the family, community, health providers and public health officials,” said DHS Secretary-designee Andrea Palm. “We are working nonstop with medical staff across the state to reduce the spread of COVID-19 and help protect the health and safety of Wisconsinites.”

Testing for COVID-19 is being done in Wisconsin through both the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene at the University of Wisconsin – Madison and at the City of Milwaukee Health Department, as well as private labs throughout the state.

Wisconsin is currently prioritizing testing for COVID-19, because of a shortage of ingredients needed to run the tests. The testing capacity is being reserved for individuals who are critically ill and healthcare workers on the front lines.

While not a perfect solution, the State is leveraging what limited resources it can. The triage effort is designed to keep Wisconsin’s healthcare workforce safe and healthy, and help stop the spread of the virus. Many states across the country are grappling with this same problem.

The Milwaukee Independent began reporting on what was then referred to as the mysterious “Wuhan Virus” in January. Other local media did not picked-up on the story until many weeks later. Our early features focused on the economic impact, social issues, and health concerns long before other Milwaukee news organizations even mentioned the coronavirus. Over the following months, we have published more than 450 articles about the pandemic and how it has affected the lives of Milwaukee residents. This extensive body of work can be found on our COVID-19 Special Report page, a chronological index of links by month. Our editorial voice remains dedicated to informing the public about this health crisis for as long as it persists.
For medical resources, please visit the CDC’s COVID-19 page or the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. All editorial content published by Milwaukee Independent can be found at mkeind.com/COVID19. With a mission of transformative journalism, our staff is free from commercial bias and are not influenced by corporate interests, political affiliations, or a public preferences that rewards clicks with revenue. As an influential publication that provides Milwaukee with quality journalism, our award-winning photojournalism and features have helped to achieve a range of positive social impact that enriches our community. Please join our effort by entrusting us with your contribution. Your Support Matters - Donate Now

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