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Author: Hannah Dugan

Frederick Charles Winkler: Milwaukee’s Hero of Gettysburg

During his life, Milwaukee attorney Frederick Winkler seemed to be everywhere. He was the Zelig of civic life in Milwaukee, the Forrest Gump of the American Civil War. And yet he is essentially unknown today. On the anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg (July 1 through July 3, 1863) it is fitting to recall one of his most remarkable achievements: commanding Wisconsin’s famous 26th regiment at Gettysburg. [1] The Back-Story About Winkler’s “Field Journal.” Winkler’s life is rather well documented because he remained a celebrated “local boy” after the Civil War, an active legal practitioner and an important public...

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Montgomery: A trail of memorials connecting the civil rights struggle to Milwaukee

This article is part of a series that connects Milwaukee’s current social conditions with efforts in Alabama cities to publicly recognize their racial histories, to document the 1960’s Civil Rights Movement, and to extend and expand the Movement’s goals towards peace and reconciliation. Temporary “medallions” painted on the sidewalk announce Montgomery as one of the New York Times 52 places to visit in 2018. Its decade long revitalization plan is visible in building restored buildings, a renewed riverfront, and history-based tourism. It is from here that the Confederate States of America installed its government to fight the Civil War;...

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Monroeville: Origins of “To Kill A Mockingbird” and its connection to Joshua Glover’s story

This article is part of a series that connects Milwaukee’s current social conditions with efforts in Alabama cities to publicly recognize their racial histories, to document the 1960’s Civil Rights Movement, and to extend and expand the Movement’s goals towards peace and reconciliation. Monroeville is the birthplace of To Kill a Mockingbird, and the hometown of the novel’s author, Harper Lee. And its people and geography serve as the genetic makeup of “Macomb,” the fictional hometown of Scout, Jem, Dill, Calpurnia, Boo Radley and Atticus Finch. In some ways, the town itself is a character in this novel. Monroeville...

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Birmingham: A Civil Rights Journey From Milwaukee to Alabama

This article is the first in a series that connects Milwaukee’s current social conditions with efforts in Alabama cities to publicly recognize their racial histories, to document the 1960’s Civil Rights Movement, and to extend and expand the Movement’s goals towards peace and reconciliation. View the companion Photo Essay for this series. A short but long anticipated trip to see the play “To Kill a Mockingbird” in rural Alabama, serendipitously expanded to become a trek along the state’s Civil Rights “trail.” Eventually, the visit planned for a few days transformed itself into an itinerary of lessons in peace and...

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Photo Essay: A search for peace along the road to reconciliation

This Photo Essay presents a overview in images of an article series that connects Milwaukee’s current social conditions with efforts in Alabama cities to publicly recognize their racial histories, to document the 1960’s Civil Rights Movement, and to extend and expand the Movement’s goals towards peace and reconciliation. The pictures summarize the trip through Alabama, and serves to visually link the series. Birmingham: A Civil Rights Journey From Milwaukee to Alabama Extended Coverage© Photo Birmingham: A Civil Rights Journey From Milwaukee to Alabama Photo Essay: A search for peace along the road to reconciliation Hannah...

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Wisconsin voters are the decision makers in judicial elections

Wisconsin Spring elections are upon us, with early voting and the April 3rd election day voting for nonpartisan offices, including state judicial officers. Wisconsin remains in the majority of states which elects its judges and justices, entrusting the entire citizenry to choose the entire branch of government. Statewide, this election cycle’s ballots include twelve contested judicial elections—one election for a ten-year term on the Wisconsin Supreme Court, and eleven elections for six-year terms in the county circuit courts of Clark, Columbia, Dane, Eau Claire, Juneau, Manitowoc, Price, Sauk, Winnebago, Waukesha and Buffalo-Pepin, one judge presides over cases in both...

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